Hedon Town Council: Concerns over negative impacts of ‘renewable industries’ development

Loss of historic views - additional concernLoss of historic views - additional concern

Loss of historic views and green space – additional concerns over commercial development

THE PROPOSALS to site a wind turbine manufacturing plant at Alexandra Dock as part of the Green Port Hull initiative have been largely welcomed by local people. But Hedon Town Council is now expressing concerns that the supplementary commercial development could bring heavy industry uncomfortably close to the town.

Hedon Town Councillors have listed their concerns over plans to site renewables supply industries on land near to the ancient town. Whilst plans to use the 80ha (200 acres) Paull Enterprise Site have been in the public domain for some time, the council is particularly concerned about the proposed use of a larger 159ha (390 acres) site for commercial development. It is feared that the location of wind turbine supply industries on this land would bring heavy industrial development right up to the Hedon by-pass on the outskirts of Hedon.

Councillors have expressed concern about the potential loss of green space between the town and new industrial developments. The green space encompasses the ancient and historic Hedon Haven area as well as a natural pond area which is populated by great crested newts, water voles and other important wildlife.

Heavy industrial development on Hedon’s doorstep, it is also feared, would have unwelcome impacts on the quality of life of local residents and increase noise, traffic and pollution. Additionally, landscape views and historic sight lines between St Andrew’s Church, Paull and Hedon’s St Augustine’s would be lost forever.

Councillor Neil Black summarised the fears of many present at the meeting; “For the sake of short-term benefits and economic gains, we might experience long-term negative impacts.”

Hedon Town Council will be making its views known as part of an East Riding Council ‘fact checking exercise’ on local development plan documents.

About the Author

Ray Duffill (Editor)
Ray Duffill (Editor)
Ray Duffill (photo by Neil Holmes) is a former community development manager but now describes himself as a beat-blogger or citizen-journalist. Ray lives in Hedon and also edits the Hedon Blog and is the Hedon correspondent for the Holderness Gazette.

5 Comments on "Hedon Town Council: Concerns over negative impacts of ‘renewable industries’ development"

  1. Maybe the use of the word “Nimby” is wrong at this stage, but i have a bee in my bonnet over this development. I applaud the work of the councils with dealing with the incinerator issues over the past 20 years but I do believe that at some point Hedon and the surrounding villages are going to have to accept some industrial development east of the present industrial boundries of Hull.

    Because of the size of the factory made components involved in this industry the land between BP and Hedon is perfect for this. At some point in the future the land will be used for industry. It is only because of the lack of industrial development in Hull over the last 30 plus years that it hasnt been used already.

    I look at this in a different way. It is not what we have got. It is what we could have! most traders in Hedon would be glad of the upturn in trade should a development of this nature take place close to Hedon itself.

    But more importantly,and this should superseed everything, is the impact such a development could have on the future of our children and grandchildren. This is the most important aspect i think.

    if the land so close to Hedon is developed it will be because the Greenport and the Paull Enterprise Park are booming and attracting investment from the supply chain network. This is good for the whole area. Im sorry to say this but if, and its still a big if, the Greenport goes ahead then we will see the area in which we live change. I think a more positive step for the council would be to open discussions with residents and business to ensure that the local economy and community benefits to the maximum from this new industry.

    yours

  2. Well done Hedon Town Council for thinking ahead on this. We need the green belt between Hull and Hedon (and Preston) to maintain quality of life. Many residents value the fact that Hedon and Preston are separate from Hull, and very distinct. This has just been recognised by the Boundary Commission. NIMBYism is the negative action of rejecting necessary but unwanted development. The development of new industry is necessary and wanted, but there is unused industrial space in East Hull very convenient to Hedon Road and the docks. It is simply not necessary to move onto greenfield sites.

  3. I did predict in the letters page some months ago that the council would think backwards and not forwards on this issue.
    NIMBYS come to mind.
    Hedon would benefit greatly from having such a new industry on its doorstep.

    • Cllr John Dennis Cllr. John Dennis. E.R.Y.C. Ward Member S.W.Holderness | October 26, 2012 at 12:28 pm | Reply

      We’re not just talking about the enterprise zone land to the west of Paull Road, James, I think we’re generally expecting that to happen anyway, it’s all associated with the Siemens project.

      The proposal that concerns me, and members of Hedon Town Council too, is the one which would involve including the massive piece of land – towards 400 acres, between the Paull Road and hedon Bypass, right down to the Hedonto Paull back road. Now that IS on the doorstep.

      This is nothing more than the landowners ABP jumping on the bandwagon and If that area of land were to be developed it would close the valuable green space between the industry at Saltend and Hedon, which has always been the fear. The development would run all along the right hand side as you come into Hedon from Saltend, right up to the Kingstown roundabout. and then onwards toward Thorngumbald.

      So in effect, there would be no real gap between the industrial eastern edge of the city, and the western boundary of Hedon – or more correctly Preston South. Where would Hedon be then? The identity of this ancient town would be in danger of being swallowed up. Would the next step be the Hull City Council going for the airport field, which they own? It would be the thin end of the wedge. Remember Sutton, it used to be a lovely country village, but it’s now lost in Hull’s urban sprawl

      Call it ‘NIMBY’ if you like, but that’s what I know our residents would expect of their elected Hedon and E.R.Y.C. Councillors. If we weren’t NIMBYs we’d be sitting under the shadow of a Mass Burn Incinerator by now !

      • I’m in agreement with Mr DENNIS on this one. While we all see the need for expansion and development some green belt must remain. Hedon must retain at least some rural land to separate it from Hull otherwise the whole character of the town would be lost. I wouldn’t be opposed to part of the planned development. However WOULD opposed to any building on the land between PAULL ROAD and HEDON BYPASS. Nor would I want any further development on the land East of Staithes Road where the old airport, racecourse was and that is currently used for cattle. These green boundaries should be protected

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